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Fever without a source, think UTI firstIn children aged older than 2 months, the pediatrician is often faced with the scenario of fever with no apparent source. Because symptoms in young patients are nonspecific and reliable urine samples require invasive testing, there can be a delay in both diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). This delay may be associated with increased risk of renal scarring and a longer duration symptomology for the young child.
Novel antimicrobial shows promise for children with AOMChildren with acute otitis media (AOM) are routinely and successfully treated with antimicrobials, with data showing that the combination of amoxicillin-clavulanate (A/C) to treat AOM in children aged younger than 3 years is associated with more favorable outcomes than placebo.
Why do so many kids die so soon following a cancer diagnosis?While improvements have been made to childhood cancer mortality rates, a recent research study aims to identify how many children die before being able to start treatment, and what interventions can be put in place to improve their chances.
There’s much to read between the covers, so get started!A look at what you can find in the July 2017 issue of Contemporary Pediatrics.
Persistent agitation in children with neurologic impairmentsCrying and agitation for no apparent reason in children with severe neurologic impairment is a common and frustrating problem for parents and providers alike. A methodical approach is helpful in dealing with this problem, yet sometimes the cause is not apparent, even after a thorough search. It is helpful to explain to parents and caretakers that the cause of the distress may take some time to figure out, and that diagnosis is often difficult. However, in most cases, a satisfactory treatment can be found.
Four strategies cut newborn readmissionsPreventing readmissions has always been a high priority for the clinicians in hospital newborn nurseries. Here's how one program works on cutting down readmission rates.
Delayed menarche with normal pubertal growthA 14-year-old female presents for a wellness visit. On history, she is noted to not have started her menstrual cycle but on physical exam has significant breast and pubic hair development since the age of 10 years.
Pediatric office paper chase: Revisited!This article will present an overview of the technology involved in scanning documents, reviewing documents, and signing documents, and provide some tips on how to expedite your document workflow.
Father, son share similar blue bumpsA father brings his 8-year-old son to the office for evaluation of new, asymptomatic blue bumps that have appeared on the boy’s chest over the last several months (Figure). The dad notes that he has had similar lesions as well.
Are children with asthma prescribed too many OCSs?An analysis of 2015 claims data for about 69,000 children with an asthma diagnosis suggests that the answer to this question is “yes.” Of these children, who were insured through a large Texas health plan for children with Medicaid and CHIP and who ranged in age from 1 to 18 years, 42.1% were given an oral corticosteroid (OCS) 1 or more times during the year; 9.9%, 2 or more times; and 3.3%, 3 or more times.
Mealtime TV use during infancy is likely to persistMore than one-third of families of 184 infants surveyed every 6 months during a 4-year period reported exposing their child to TV during meals.
Adverse childhood experiences are linked to ADHDDiagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at age 9 years is associated with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), according to an analysis of data for 1572 children who are part of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) birth cohort.
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