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August 2017 Default Cover Image
AAP's first-ever action plan for epinephrine and anaphylaxisAnaphylaxis is a serious, life-threatening allergic reaction that can occur suddenly without warning. In children and adolescents, the leading cause of anaphylaxis is exposure to food allergens. Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published 2 clinical reports that discuss guidance on appropriate epinephrine use for anaphylaxis and developing an emergency action plan for patients at risk.
Tympanostomy tubes improve short-term hearing but lack long-term benefitTympanostomy tubes are widely used in pediatric care, taking first place as the most popular ambulatory surgery. However, new research reveals that tube placement provides just short-term hearing improvement and has little impact on quality of life.
Allergy and anaphylaxis emergency plan formThe American Academy of Pediatrics form for an allergy and anaphylaxis emergency plan.
Teen vaping: Time to clear the airThe vaping culture of using non–cigarette tobacco and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) is the latest risky trend among adolescents and young adults. Vaping is the use of high-tech, advanced electronic devices such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), refillable atomizers, and other tobacco products as an alternative or in addition to regular cigarettes.
E-cigarettes: A legislative updateOn August 8, 2016, Mitch Zeller, JD, blogged on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website that beginning that day, federal law would protect the public—especially kids—from the dangers of all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), vapes, and more. The law, known as the Deeming Rule, would regulate the largely unregulated market that he referred to as having been the “wild, wild West.”
How to perform a better physical examThere is a trend in internal medicine to get away from doing complete physical examinations on each visit, with a minimalistic approach to a healthy patient. I am not prepared to go that far just yet, but I have modified my examination in many ways over the years. Here are some gems I have unearthed.
Restore “honest” medicineIt seems that our healthcare system is overdue for an integrity/honesty overhaul. Let’s review how we can begin the process of restoration at the practice and healthcare system levels.
Nervous teenager’s hands turn blueThe father of a healthy 15-year-old girl brings her to the emergency department (ED) for evaluation of blue hands.
Girl’s blistering rash spreads to eyes and faceA healthy 9-year-old female presents with a 1-day history of fever, progressive rash, conjunctivitis, and superficial oral ulcers.
Pediatricians could be overprescribing combination antifungal/corticosteroidsA review of a large claims-based database suggests that they are. Investigators identified almost 10,000 children aged up to 14 years who were prescribed either Lotrisone or Mycolog-II creams (antifungal and corticosteroid combination products) by pediatricians and other specialists from 2007 through 2014.
Novel approach to neonatal abstinence syndrome shortens hospital stayInfants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) treated with supportive nonpharmacologic interventions have a substantially shorter hospital stay and are less likely to be treated with morphine, a new study shows.
Q-tips are still causing pediatric ear injuriesBetween 1990 and 2010, more than 260,000 children were treated in emergency departments (EDs) for ear injuries related to use of cotton-tip applicators (CTAs), according to data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.
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