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How to help adult children of alcoholic parentsWhat would make pediatricians wonder if a parent in their office might be “an adult child of an alcoholic parent?” The following case could be viewed as representative.
Pediatric hypertensionHypertension in children is not just a specialty problem. It's much more common in general pediatrics than community pediatricians might realize.
Wet pants and constipationThe relationship between the urinary tract and the lower gastrointestinal tract impacts urinary tract infections (UTIs) and urinary incontinence in children.
Antibiotics, UTI, and VURThe diagnosis and treatment of reflux in children with a history of urinary tract infections (UTIs) keeps evolving—it's hardly a settled issue. Regarding antibiotic prophylaxis in these children, said Saul P. Greenfield, MD, FAAP, FACS, the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial reveals that it may be better to overtreat than undertreat.
Brittle or battered?Many pediatricians need to step up their game in understanding and diagnosing rare disease processes whose symptoms can mimic those of child abuse.
Primary care psychopharmacologyEvidence-based guidance is available to help primary care practitioners provide psychopharmacologic treatment for behavioral disorders.
When to look harder at jaundiceEven though most babies with jaundice have uncomplicated jaundice, 18% of them will have their course complicated by hemolysis.
Family meals matterTeaching children healthy eating habits requires setting a good example by sharing meals with them, said Irene Chatoor, MD, FAAP, in her session "Food refusal: From picky eating to feeding disorders."
New weight-management algorithmThe long-awaited American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) weight-management algorithm for obesity provides a comprehensive, evidence-based translation for real-world use.
Bigger, faster, strongerProperly supervised strength training can help children both short-term and long-term, providing the foundation for an active, healthy life.
What's autism, what's notOne in 68 children has an autism-spectrum disorder (ASD). When screening children, however, physicians must be aware that many other developmental disorders occur more commonly.
Push the HPV vaccineTo reduce human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, pediatricians must strongly recommend the underutilized HPV vaccine in preteens.
NAFLD: Silent manifestation of obesityAs the prevalence of childhood obesity has grown, said David Brumbaugh, MD, FAAP, so has the importance of identifying early signs of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
Infant with facial lesions and respiratory distressA 2-month-old Hispanic girl is transferred by her pediatrician to the emergency department (ED) for evaluation of decreased oral intake, failure to thrive, and large bleeding facial hemangiomas.
Watercooler wisdom 2: Preventing (and treating) physician burnoutPhysician “burnout” has become a popular topic in medical journals. It is worthwhile to discuss this important topic so we can recognize the symptoms of burnout, seek help when necessary, and change our work environment to prevent burnout and its consequences.
Adolescent with enlarging asymptomatic birthmarkAn 11-year-old girl asks her pediatrician about an asymptomatic birthmark on her right thigh that drains clear to slightly bloody-tinged fluid occasionally when scratched. It has increased in size proportionally as she has grown.
Do LABAs given with glucocorticoids increase severe asthma events?Results of a randomized trial in children with asthma comparing concomitant use of the inhaled glucocorticoid fluticasone propionate plus the long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) salmeterol with use of fluticasone alone indicate that the answer to this question is “no.”
Some infantile hemangiomas can be managed with topical therapySuperficial, relatively thin infantile hemangiomas (IHs) responded to several months of treatment with topical timolol maleate in a recent trial, suggesting that this treatment is an alternative to oral propranolol for selected IHs.
Early bedtimes may lower risk for obesityPreschool-aged children who go to bed early are half as likely as those whose bedtime is late to be obese as adolescents, according to a new study.
Continued play after concussion lengthens recovery timeAthletes who continued to play after experiencing a concussion were 8.8 times more likely to take a long time to recover (≥21 days) than athletes who immediately left the field.
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