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Filling medical gaps in foster careThe pediatrician may be one of the only sources of advocacy, support, stability, and advice for the child in foster care. In that role, he or she must understand the needs and experiences of a foster child compared with other patients in the practice so that the unmet needs of this vulnerable population can be addressed.
Guidelines for life after LEAPAs the number of infants and children developing peanut allergy continues to grow, so does the need for pediatricians and other primary care providers to understand current recommendations on how best to prevent this allergy.
Trauma-informed care helps children in foster careApproximately 500,000 children spend time in foster care annually, and the majority of children in foster care have complicated and unmet healthcare needs.
Toilet training kids with ASD: Part 1Incontinence can be a common problem for children with significant developmental disabilities, impacting where they can go and who needs to go with them; leaving them at risk for neglect or abuse; leading to infections and poor skin health; even affecting vocational plans or future housing. Yet toilet training is still possible for these children.
Health home meets foster care’s complex needsAn integrated health home in North Texas aims to fill disparities in physical and mental health, educational attainment, and special healthcare needs for today’s children in foster care.
Right question resolves teen’s pain dilemmaA 16-year-old girl presents to an emergency department (ED) accompanied by her boyfriend to report a 24-hour history of right lower quadrant pain. The pain is associated with midline lower back pain and light vaginal bleeding (1 to 2 tampons per day). She has experienced some nausea but no vomiting.
Pediatric call centers fast-track urgent careThe first call center was introduced in 1988 as a uniquely pediatric innovation. This month’s article presents a brief history of call centers, discusses their advantages, and describes how they will improve patient care.
Boy’s progressing rash could delay surgeryA preoperative evaluation is requested for a 15-year-old boy who is a renal transplant patient maintained on oral mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. His parents are worried that an itchy rash on his hands and feet, which has been progressing over the last 4 months, will result in postponement of his surgery.
FDA’s youth antismoking campaign boasts good resultsExposure to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) youth-specific national antismoking media campaign—The Real Cost—was associated with preventing young persons from beginning to smoke.
Age-restricted supplements sold to male teensSales associates at health food stores, which primarily sell dietary supplements, often recommend creatine products and, sometimes, testosterone boosters to young teenaged boys, according to a study involving 244 stores in 49 states.
Crizanlizumab helps prevent pain crises in sickle cell diseaseIn patients with sickle cell disease, therapy with crizanlizumab, an antibody against the adhesion molecule P-selectin, resulted in a significantly lower rate of sickle cell-related pain crises than placebo, a trial in 198 patients aged from 16 to 65 years showed.
HPS develops in premature infants later than in term infantsA study in 217 premature infants with HPS showed that premature infants are likely to present with HPS at an older age than are term infants with this condition.
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