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Parental knowledge, physician support key to HPV vaccine uptakeParental knowledge and provider support are key factors in increasing acceptance and uptake of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among parents of boys, according to a new report.
Why are teens not being treated for opioid use disorders?While opioid use disorders among teens and young adults are increasing, the number of youths who receive medication to treat opioid use is decreasing, with significant inequalities among population types.
Preemies can be just as kindergarten ready as their peersA new study reveals that premature infants perform nearly as well as their full-term peers by their school years, and that those who don’t aren’t as far behind their peers as previously thought.
OME management often strays from guidelinesMost physicians are not adhering to recommendations on otitis media management, according to a new report from the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF).
Tympanostomy tubes improve short-term hearing but lack long-term benefitTympanostomy tubes are widely used in pediatric care, taking first place as the most popular ambulatory surgery. However, new research reveals that tube placement provides just short-term hearing improvement and has little impact on quality of life.
There’s much to read between the covers, so get started!A look at what you can find in the July 2017 issue of Contemporary Pediatrics.
Fever without a source, think UTI first
Fever without a source, think UTI firstIn children aged older than 2 months, the pediatrician is often faced with the scenario of fever with no apparent source. Because symptoms in young patients are nonspecific and reliable urine samples require invasive testing, there can be a delay in both diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). This delay may be associated with increased risk of renal scarring and a longer duration symptomology for the young child.
Are children with asthma prescribed too many OCSs?An analysis of 2015 claims data for about 69,000 children with an asthma diagnosis suggests that the answer to this question is “yes.” Of these children, who were insured through a large Texas health plan for children with Medicaid and CHIP and who ranged in age from 1 to 18 years, 42.1% were given an oral corticosteroid (OCS) 1 or more times during the year; 9.9%, 2 or more times; and 3.3%, 3 or more times.
Mealtime TV use during infancy is likely to persistMore than one-third of families of 184 infants surveyed every 6 months during a 4-year period reported exposing their child to TV during meals.
Adverse childhood experiences are linked to ADHDDiagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at age 9 years is associated with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), according to an analysis of data for 1572 children who are part of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) birth cohort.

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