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Pediatric Dermatology

Protuberant blister over newborn’s lumbar spineA healthy full-term newborn presented with a prominent sacral dimple within an oval patch. Ultrasound showed no evidence of spinal anomalies, and the child was discharged home. Three days later, the patch became elevated, red, and moist appearing, and she was brought to the emergency department (ED) for further evaluation of the “growing blister.”
Can you solve these 6 puzzling cases?We know you love a diagnostic challenge. Can you crack these 6 puzzling cases?
Rapidly growing nodule on infant’s posterior thighThe parents of a healthy 5-month-old boy bring him to the office for evaluation of an enlarging yellowish nodule on the back of his right thigh. It started as a pink macule several months ago and became yellow and lumpy over the last month. The infant was born at term and has grown and developed normally. His parents deny any trauma, but report occasional bleeding from the surface of the nodule. They deny any new medications or outdoor exposures. There is no history of new topical skin products.
Racial and ethnic disparities abound in eczema careEczema affects around 11% of children overall, but only about half of minority children with severe eczema are treated for the condition. A new study looks at why these children are overlooked.
Does pediatric psoriasis increase cancer risk? (VIDEO)For Contemporary Pediatrics, Dr Bobby Lazzara discusses a large retrospective cohort study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology that examined whether children with pediatric psoriasis are at increased risk of cancer and discusses 2 caveats to the findings.
Teenaged girl distressed by persistent rashA 16-year-old girl presents for evaluation of an asymptomatic brown rash over her central chest and back that developed over the preceding 6 months. She is embarrassed by the appearance.