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Pediatrics

Recurrent brown spots in an infant girlA mother brings her healthy 6-month-old girl to the outpatient clinic with disseminated, asymptomatic, golden-brown bumps that occasionally become red and swollen.
Improve your practice: Facilitate patient accessA major dilemma for patients is simply how to access good care that is both convenient and affordable. To thrive in these challenging times, practices should consider all options to facilitate patient access. If you have an open mind, you may even consider changing your “traditional” practice to one that provides “direct primary care.”
Possible link between unhealthy prenatal diet and ADHDA longitudinal study examined the relationship between prenatal or postnatal high-fat, high-sugar diet and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children who demonstrated either early-onset persistent conduct disorder or minimal conduct problems.
Urolithiasis in children
Urolithiasis in childrenUrolithiasis occurrence is increasing in both adults and children in the United States, with nearly 1 in 11 adults having a stone at some time in their life. Unfortunately, stone occurrence in children also appears to have increased from 1% to 2% in the 1950s to 1970s to almost 10%.
Kid care on the slopesSkiing is an enormously popular winter sport for children, teenagers, and families. Here's a review of winter sports injuries and how to provide the best care.
Small-for-age toddler is unable to walkA 22-month-old African American boy born at 38 weeks by normal vaginal delivery presents to a local hospital from a private pediatric office for failure to thrive. He was seen by his pediatrician until aged 1 month but was lost to follow-up. His delay in walking prompted his mother to reestablish care at age 22 months.
Injury prevention starts with youThe article “National hospital initiative targets preventable injuries,” in the most recent issue of Contemporary Pediatrics, describes 35 years of impressive work by a nationwide coalition of concerned pediatricians and pediatric trauma surgeons who have championed hospital, school-based, and community-wide initiatives to reduce the prevalence and incidence of unintentional injuries in children.
Infant’s disseminated rash is twice misdiagnosedA frustrated mother carries her 2-month-old son into the office for evaluation of a diffuse bright red rash with dramatic hypopigmentation. Scalp, neck, axillary, and diaper areas are involved.
Newborn with persistent hypoglycemiaA full-term male infant was born to a 33-year-old gravida 3, para 3 mother. The prenatal course was uncomplicated, without gestational diabetes; the mother received prenatal care at an out-of-state institution. At the delivery, however, the baby was notably macrosomic, with shoulder dystocia and perinatal distress requiring positive pressure ventilation.
Best tech for pediatrics: 2016At the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exibition (NCE) in October, I again presented 2 workshops on office technologies, sponsored by the AAP’s Section on Advances in Technology and Therapeutics. I made every effort to make this year’s workshop a unique experience, showcasing some new technology while including some of my old favorites.