/ /

Pat F Bass III, MD, MS, MPH
Fever without a source, think UTI first
Fever without a source, think UTI first
In children aged older than 2 months, the pediatrician is often faced with the scenario of fever with no apparent source. Because symptoms in young patients are nonspecific and reliable urine samples require invasive testing, there can be a delay in both diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). This delay may be associated with increased risk of renal scarring and a longer duration symptomology for the young child.
Lactose intolerance: Diagnosis and diet strategies
Lactose intolerance: Diagnosis and diet strategies
Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and flatulence following ingestion of milk or products containing milk are common complaints in pediatric practices. The pediatrician needs to be aware of the management of lactose intolerance to help guide a reasonable workup and plan.
Filling medical gaps in foster care
Filling medical gaps in foster care
The pediatrician may be one of the only sources of advocacy, support, stability, and advice for the child in foster care. In that role, he or she must understand the needs and experiences of a foster child compared with other patients in the practice so that the unmet needs of this vulnerable population can be addressed.
BPD: Complication of prematurity
BPD: Complication of prematurity
Despite improvements in obstetric and neonatal care leading to increased survival of premature infants, little progress has been made in the prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Pediatricians need to be aware of changing definitions, risk factors, prevention, and long-term health outcomes of this disease in their premature patients.
Factoring the metabolic X syndrome
Factoring the metabolic X syndrome
Although there is debate surrounding the definition of metabolic X syndrome in pediatrics and there are few long-term studies of outcomes in children with metabolic syndrome, pediatric metabolic syndrome needs to be on the radar of all pediatricians interested in ensuring a healthy adult life for their patients.
Opioids: A pediatric epidemic
Opioid use is now a significant problem for the pediatrician and the families served in pediatric practices. Whereas patients with a prior history of drug use, misuse, or suspicions of drug misuse have long been studied, monitored, screened, and treated for adverse outcomes, opioid-naïve patients with legitimate medical reasons for opioid prescriptions may represent a greater risk for opioid complications.
Pediatrician’s primer on sexting
Sexting is the act of sending or receiving sexually explicit or sexually suggestive photos, messages, or videos digitally by text, e-mail, or instant messaging from a smartphone or computer device. It is more common among teenagers than one might think.
Infection control: “When can my child return to school?”
Infection control: “When can my child return to school?”
Two common questions asked of pediatricians by parents are “When can my child return to school?” and “how long will I be staying home with my child?” Understanding when, how long, and under what conditions a pediatric patient with an infection is contagious to others is an important part of disease prevention and treatment.
Deciphering bacterial meningitis
The introduction of conjugated vaccines has decreased the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children, amounting to one of the biggest public health successes in the practicing pediatrician’s career.
5 baby steps to better nutrition
Patients often want to make big changes to improve their health. However, there often is a disconnect between wanting to make a change and the ability to carry the change through and make it a habit.

Poll